Skiing the Beartooth Highway – Extreme!

The Beartooth Highway is open for the 2013 summer travel season.  Enjoy the drive!

The Beartooth Highway provides access to some of the highest elevations and most unique terrain in North America.  With unique terrain comes a unique opportunity to ski atop the Beartooth Plateau at the Twin Lakes Headwall.  The Beartooth Basin Summer Ski Area is open and waiting for adventure enthusiasts.

Established in the mid-1960’s by Austrians Pepi Gramshammer, Eric Sailer and Anderl Molterer as an Alpine Ski Racing summer training ground. Beartooth Basin (formerly The Red Lodge International Ski and Snowboard Camp) is one of North America’s oldest alpine ski training areas. As the previous owners aged, they found themselves bowing out to a younger generation of skiing enthusiasts who looked to open the area to the public and not just the private groups and teams as had been tradition in the past. The newer ownership group has changed a bit over the years and is now majority controlled by the team listed to the side. The ski area is staffed with professional ski patrol and and lift attendants just as any other ski area, but with a summer like setting above 10,000 feet that can sometimes turn to winter at a moments notice. Please note, there is no lodge or warming hut facilities. You could call it back country skiing with a lift.

 

For more information, a calendar of events, and some radical video footage visit the Beartoth Basin Ski Summer Ski Area at:  beartoothbasin.com

 

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Did You Know?

Fishing Beartooth Highway

The cutthroat is the only true western native trout. Originally wide spread throughout the state, it is now relegated to the higher, cooler, more inaccessible back country lakes and streams. Cutthroats are easily identified by the bright red “cut” on the lower jaw.

Cooke City Montana - Beartooth Highway

The Cooke City cemetery is located only a short distance from town, adjacent to the Gallatin National Forest Service Campground. Within the plot lie the remains of many who cherished the hope for the future of Cooke City, including one of its founders, Horn Miller.   When lumber for coffins were needed, men of the community simply used parts of uninhabited buildings to construct the boxes.