Plowing Videos Available On-line!

Two great websites are offering on-line video of Beartooth Highway spring plowing progress, and Yellowstone National Park road plowing updates.  Visit them for daily progress reports as you plan your 2013 Beartooth Highway adventure!

Montana Department of Transportation Updates – Beartooth Highway Plowing Videos

Published on Apr 29, 2013

Halfway between Vista Point and Mae West. Crews came in early this morning while the snow is still cold. The snow gets “sticky” in the afternoon sun.

Yellowstone National Park Makes Plowing Progress

Plowing park roads is a monumental challenge each year. Unpredictable spring snow storms or other events can slow plowing progress. It is not uncommon for plowing crews to re-plow sections of park roads when weather events happen. Each spring, park road crews clear snow and ice from 198 miles of main road, 124 miles of secondary roads and 125 acres of parking lots inside the park as well as 31 miles of the Beartooth Highway outside the park’s Northeast Entrance to prepare for the summer season.

Visit the Yellowstone National Park website for additional plowing information

Visit the Yellowstone National Park Flickr site to view plowing videos

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Did You Know?

 

Beartooth Highway Wyoming & Montana

Whirlpools often form when water rushes through a rough channel.  Water glancing off rocks starts spinning as it is hit by other water rushing by.  Any material caught up in the whirlpool will spin with the water.  In time, spinning sand, pebbles and grave may carve potholes, like the ones seen in the rocks above the bridge.  During the construction of Lake Creek bridge, boulders were removed from the creek’s bed the water channel was changed exposing the potholes.  Watch for them when you visit Lake Creek Falls.

Clay Butte Lookout - Beartooth Highway

The Clay Butte Lookout was built in 1942 by the Civilian Conservation Corps and was used as a fire lookout. It was staffed until the 1960s, when aircraft proved a better tool for fire detection. Today, because of its popular scenic vantage point and proximity to the Beartooth Highway, Clay Butte is used as a visitor information site. It was remodeled in 1962 and has been staffed since 1975 by volunteers. The focus of Clay Butte today is to give visitors a glimpse of how fire lookouts functioned 60 years ago. Sightseers driving the scenic byway stop to obtain information or take in the view, which includes wildlife, botanical areas, the effects of the Clover-Mist wildfire of 1988, and the geology of ancient seas that once covered the Beartooth Plateau.