Documents & Reports

Documents & Reports

Documents & Reports

2012-2013 Beartooth Highway Economic Impact Survey

The purpose of this study was to assess the economic impacts and visitor use of the Beartooth Highway. Until now, little was known about visitors to the Beartooth Highway Region. Data was collected from visitors during the 2012 summer and 2012-2013 winter seasons. In total, over 4,000 summer visitors and 1,600 winter visitors were intercepted during the study.

The Beartooth Highway is a nationally designated National Scenic Byways “All-American Road” situated in south-central Montana and north-west Wyoming. It spans 68-miles from Red Lodge, MT to the northeast entrance of Yellowstone National Park. Three gateway communities comprise the Beartooth Highway Region: Cooke City/Colter Pass/Silver Gate, Montana, Red Lodge, Montana, and Cody, Wyoming.

This report is a compilation of all reports generated from the study:

1. 2012 Summer economic impacts, use, and destination image report – This report details the summer data collection period and the respective results. Summer data collection began on May 31, 2012 and was completed in mid-September, 2012.

2. 2012-2013 Winter economic impacts, use, and destination image report – This report details the winter data collection period and respective results. Data collection for winter visitation was mid-December, 2012 through mid-April, 2013.

3. 2013 Qualitative analysis of activity specialization of snowmobilers in Cooke City/Colter Pass/Silver Gate, Montana – In-depth interviews were conducted with snowmobilers in Cooke City/Colter Pass/Silver Gate during January, 2013. Themes and insights about snowmobiling in the Beartooth Region are compiled, outlined, and examined in this report.

Download 2012-2013 Beartooth Highway Economic Impact Survey here.

Cooke City Snow Plowing Summit
On May 20, 2011 Friends of the Beartooth All-American Road assisted Park County Montana Marty Malone with conducting a Snow Plowing Summit in Cooke City, Montana. The stated goal of the meeting was to gather accurate information regarding the potential for  maintaining the Beartooth Highway year-round in order to provide rubber-tire vehicle access to Cooke City and Sliver Gate, MT and Yellowstone National Park. During the meetingn questions were recorded that require additional research and information gathering. Those questions, along with original meeting documentation, public comments, and recorded meeting minutes are included in the working document available here. This document is a work in progress and will be updated as additional comments and information are gathered.

Cooke City Snow Plowing Summit Working Document – 1.4 MB pdf file

Beartooth Highway Corridor Management Plan
The Beartooth All-American Road Corridor Management Plan (CMP) provides a
vision, goals, and management recommendations for protecting and enhancing a 53-
mile portion of the Beartooth Highway referred to as the Beartooth All-American
Road (AAR). Friends of the Beartooth All-American Road use the CMP as a guide for establishing projects and work priorities.

BAAR Corridor Management Plan– 1.6 MG pdf file

FBAAR Annual Reports
FBAAR Annual Reports provide a snapshot of the AAR activities over the last year. This report reflects the results of an organization working through local and regional partnerships that benefit local residents and area visitors.

2010 FBAAR Annual Report – 130 KB pdf file

2011 FBAAR Annual Report – 234 KB pdf file

Did You Know?

Fishing Beartooth Highway

The cutthroat is the only true western native trout. Originally wide spread throughout the state, it is now relegated to the higher, cooler, more inaccessible back country lakes and streams. Cutthroats are easily identified by the bright red “cut” on the lower jaw.

Cooke City Montana - Beartooth Highway

The Cooke City cemetery is located only a short distance from town, adjacent to the Gallatin National Forest Service Campground. Within the plot lie the remains of many who cherished the hope for the future of Cooke City, including one of its founders, Horn Miller.   When lumber for coffins were needed, men of the community simply used parts of uninhabited buildings to construct the boxes.