Clay Butte Lookout Tower Celebrates Designation

Clay Butte Lookout Tower Celebrates Designation

Cody, Wyo. (August 12, 2014) – The Shoshone National Forest and the Friends of Clay Butte will hold a free, public ceremony on Saturday, August 23th at 2:00pm. The ceremony will celebrate the lookout’s placement on the National Register of Historic Places.

The ceremony will be held at the Clay Butte Lookout tower along Forest Road 142, which is a gravel road off of US Highway 212. District Ranger Sue Stresser will speak during the ceremony, a commemorative plaque will be unveiled, and special guest Keith Kincaid will recall his days working on the construction of the lookout tower.

The Clay Butte Lookout tower was completed in 1943 and was in operation until the 1960s. Thanks to the cooperation between the Shoshone National Forest and the Friends of Clay Butte, the tower is now open as a visitor center and museum. You can see the tower’s original Osbourne Fire Finder, learn about the history of fire lookouts, and take in the panoramic mountain view while visiting the tower.

As the nation’s first national forest, the Shoshone National Forest has 2.4 million acres of diverse terrain and a mission to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the forest to meet the needs of present and future generations.

Contact: Kristie Salzmann 307.578.5190 |  http://www.fs.usda.gov/shoshone/

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Did You Know?

Fishing Beartooth Highway

The cutthroat is the only true western native trout. Originally wide spread throughout the state, it is now relegated to the higher, cooler, more inaccessible back country lakes and streams. Cutthroats are easily identified by the bright red “cut” on the lower jaw.

Clay Butte Lookout - Beartooth Highway

The Clay Butte Lookout was built in 1942 by the Civilian Conservation Corps and was used as a fire lookout. It was staffed until the 1960s, when aircraft proved a better tool for fire detection. Today, because of its popular scenic vantage point and proximity to the Beartooth Highway, Clay Butte is used as a visitor information site. It was remodeled in 1962 and has been staffed since 1975 by volunteers. The focus of Clay Butte today is to give visitors a glimpse of how fire lookouts functioned 60 years ago. Sightseers driving the scenic byway stop to obtain information or take in the view, which includes wildlife, botanical areas, the effects of the Clover-Mist wildfire of 1988, and the geology of ancient seas that once covered the Beartooth Plateau.