Beartooth Highway Opens May 23, 2014

Beartooth Highway Opens May 23, 2014

The entire Beartooth Highway including Beartooth Pass will open Friday, May 23, 2014. Traffic gates will open at 9:00 am at both ends of the Highway.

Travelers will be able to drive the entire 68 miles of the Highway from Red Lodge to Cooke City, Montana.

The Chief Joseph Scenic Byway (WY 296) is also open for travel and provides access to the Beartooth Highway and the Northeast Entrance to Yellowstone National Park.

There is always the potential for snow and icy road conditions at high elevations of the Beartooth Highway this time of year, especially as spring/summer weather moves through the area. Travelers are encouraged to drive with caution and travel slowly. Cell phone service is very limited along the Beartooth Highway so a check of weather and road conditions should be made prior to travel.

Road information will be posted to the beartoothhighway.com website as it becomes available. Travelers may also call the following for updates:

Cody, Wyoming Visitor Center: 307-587-2777
Cooke City, Montana Visitor Center: 406-838-2495
Red Lodge, Montana Visitor Center: 406-446-1718
Yellowstone Park Road Report: 307-344-2117

Safe travels everyone – and enjoy the Beartooth Highway – Montana and Wyoming’s National Scenic Byways All-American Road.

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Did You Know?

 

Beartooth Highway Wyoming & Montana

Whirlpools often form when water rushes through a rough channel.  Water glancing off rocks starts spinning as it is hit by other water rushing by.  Any material caught up in the whirlpool will spin with the water.  In time, spinning sand, pebbles and grave may carve potholes, like the ones seen in the rocks above the bridge.  During the construction of Lake Creek bridge, boulders were removed from the creek’s bed the water channel was changed exposing the potholes.  Watch for them when you visit Lake Creek Falls.

Fishing Beartooth Highway

The cutthroat is the only true western native trout. Originally wide spread throughout the state, it is now relegated to the higher, cooler, more inaccessible back country lakes and streams. Cutthroats are easily identified by the bright red “cut” on the lower jaw.