A Must See – Lake Creek Falls Bridge

A Must See – Lake Creek Falls Bridge

 

 

Located approximately 1 1/2 miles east of the Beartooth Highway’s junction with the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway (WY 296) a stop at Lake Creek Falls provides travelers an opportunity to view one of the few remaining structures of the original road across the Beartooth Plateau.

Constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps the Lake Creek Falls bridge shows the craftsmanship of the Work Project Administration projects of the Depression Era. The granite rocks used for construction were hand shaped with stone chisels so that each fit snugly in place. The bridge was completed in 1932.

Increased traffic, wider, longer luxurious automobiles and the introduction of motor homes necessitated an enlarged bridge and in 1974 a new steel bridge structure was completed across Lake Creek.

The site is not well marked and easy to miss but worth the visit! Pull outs are located at each end of the bridge site, and an approximately 1200 foot long walking trail takes visitors to the original bridge site.

Hope you find this information useful!

Kim Capron – Friends of the Beartooth All-American Road

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Did You Know?

Clay Butte Lookout - Beartooth Highway

The Clay Butte Lookout was built in 1942 by the Civilian Conservation Corps and was used as a fire lookout. It was staffed until the 1960s, when aircraft proved a better tool for fire detection. Today, because of its popular scenic vantage point and proximity to the Beartooth Highway, Clay Butte is used as a visitor information site. It was remodeled in 1962 and has been staffed since 1975 by volunteers. The focus of Clay Butte today is to give visitors a glimpse of how fire lookouts functioned 60 years ago. Sightseers driving the scenic byway stop to obtain information or take in the view, which includes wildlife, botanical areas, the effects of the Clover-Mist wildfire of 1988, and the geology of ancient seas that once covered the Beartooth Plateau.

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