A Must See – Lake Creek Falls Bridge

A Must See – Lake Creek Falls Bridge

 

 

Located approximately 1 1/2 miles east of the Beartooth Highway’s junction with the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway (WY 296) a stop at Lake Creek Falls provides travelers an opportunity to view one of the few remaining structures of the original road across the Beartooth Plateau.

Constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps the Lake Creek Falls bridge shows the craftsmanship of the Work Project Administration projects of the Depression Era. The granite rocks used for construction were hand shaped with stone chisels so that each fit snugly in place. The bridge was completed in 1932.

Increased traffic, wider, longer luxurious automobiles and the introduction of motor homes necessitated an enlarged bridge and in 1974 a new steel bridge structure was completed across Lake Creek.

The site is not well marked and easy to miss but worth the visit! Pull outs are located at each end of the bridge site, and an approximately 1200 foot long walking trail takes visitors to the original bridge site.

Hope you find this information useful!

Kim Capron – Friends of the Beartooth All-American Road

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Did You Know?

 

Friends of the Beartooth All-American Road

Friends of the Beartooth All-American Road is a non-profit organization established to interpret, showcase & preserve the Beartooth All- American Road as the nation’s premier rooftop scenic experience through the partnerships among gateway communities and agencies. Much of FBAAR’s work is guided by the Corridor Management Plan that was written to secure the All-American Road designation with the National Scenic Byways Program.  Contributions to the organization ensure on-going support of the beartoothhighway.com website and distribution of the Beartooth Highway RoadReport e-newsletter.

 





 

Cooke City Montana - Beartooth Highway

The Cooke City cemetery is located only a short distance from town, adjacent to the Gallatin National Forest Service Campground. Within the plot lie the remains of many who cherished the hope for the future of Cooke City, including one of its founders, Horn Miller.   When lumber for coffins were needed, men of the community simply used parts of uninhabited buildings to construct the boxes.